Presenter Information

Amanda HendersonFollow

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Major

Psychology

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

In the current study, a continuous action sequence task was administered to test the application of conflict adaptation hypothesis. EEG activity measured changes in frontal-midline theta-ERS, corresponding with activation of the ACC and PFC. Participants underwent a typing task with a directional hand cue (left or right) with a congruent or incongruent typed word response. Changes in frontal-midline theta-ERS in the EEG during conflicting trials revealed the compensatory mechanism of previous ACC firing recruiting subsequent PFC activity. This compensatory mechanism supports action sequence literature and further supports time-sensitive interactions between ACC and PFC activity during conflict in the environment.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Lawrence P. Behmer Jr., Ph.D, Department of Psychology

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Increases in midline and frontal EEG theta power reflect dynamic changes in the need for control when conflict in the environment is high during continuous action sequencing.

In the current study, a continuous action sequence task was administered to test the application of conflict adaptation hypothesis. EEG activity measured changes in frontal-midline theta-ERS, corresponding with activation of the ACC and PFC. Participants underwent a typing task with a directional hand cue (left or right) with a congruent or incongruent typed word response. Changes in frontal-midline theta-ERS in the EEG during conflicting trials revealed the compensatory mechanism of previous ACC firing recruiting subsequent PFC activity. This compensatory mechanism supports action sequence literature and further supports time-sensitive interactions between ACC and PFC activity during conflict in the environment.