Presentation Title

Gestures in the Courtroom

Presenter Information

Mary NagaiFollow

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Major

Psychology

Anticipated Graduation Year

2022

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Research has found that nonverbal body language impacts psychosocial perception in the courtroom. This study examines whether different types of gesture effects a speaker’s likability, credibility, persuasiveness, and memorability in a court room setting. After watching the plaintiff video, participants were tested on their memory of the statement, and how likable, credible, and persuasive the speaker was. Participants also indicated which side was more guilty. There was no significant difference between conditions for likability, credibility, memorability, and guilt. When asked to freely recall spatial information, participants that viewed representational gesture were significantly more accurate than the other conditions.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Elizabeth Wakefield, faculty mentor, psychology department

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Gestures in the Courtroom

Research has found that nonverbal body language impacts psychosocial perception in the courtroom. This study examines whether different types of gesture effects a speaker’s likability, credibility, persuasiveness, and memorability in a court room setting. After watching the plaintiff video, participants were tested on their memory of the statement, and how likable, credible, and persuasive the speaker was. Participants also indicated which side was more guilty. There was no significant difference between conditions for likability, credibility, memorability, and guilt. When asked to freely recall spatial information, participants that viewed representational gesture were significantly more accurate than the other conditions.