Presentation Title

Frankie Diaz

Presenter Information

Francisco DiazFollow

Major

Psychology

Anticipated Graduation Year

2023

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Current treatments for cancer have been successful in decreasing the size of the tumors and prolonging life, but often do not result in long-term remission. A promising new type of therapy uses a patient’s blood or tumor tissue to help their immune system fight cancer. Chimeric antigen receptors provide antigen-binding and T-cell activating functions which strengthen the immune system and selectively target the patient’s tumor. New research has investigated the use of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes in the treatment of cancer in the hope of more effective oncolytic properties and lasting remissions. The specific hypothesis of the current project is that CAR-T exosomes transfer RNA to cancer cells.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Will Zhang, PHD Candidate, Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Dr. W. Keith Jones, Research Mentor, Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics

Supported By

Dr. Michael Nishimura, Loyola University Chicago Cancer Center; Gina Scurti, Lab tech, Loyola University Chicago Cancer Center

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Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Frankie Diaz

Current treatments for cancer have been successful in decreasing the size of the tumors and prolonging life, but often do not result in long-term remission. A promising new type of therapy uses a patient’s blood or tumor tissue to help their immune system fight cancer. Chimeric antigen receptors provide antigen-binding and T-cell activating functions which strengthen the immune system and selectively target the patient’s tumor. New research has investigated the use of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes in the treatment of cancer in the hope of more effective oncolytic properties and lasting remissions. The specific hypothesis of the current project is that CAR-T exosomes transfer RNA to cancer cells.