Major

Neuroscience

Anticipated Graduation Year

2020

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Up until recently work in the field of binaural hearing has operated under the prevailing belief that interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) produce similar “precedence effects.” However, recent evidence seems to suggest that precedence effects are much more robust for stimuli carrying an ITD than those carrying an ILD. In order to further explore how the precedence effect varies across binaural cues, we will examine the asymmetries in the processing of ITDs and ILDs as subjects make several left-right judgments based on information carried by an echo pulse in the presence of a binaural cue (ITD or ILD) favoring the left or right ear. We expect to see more pronounced precedence effects for conditions containing an ITD, as is consistent with the most recent data on binaural hearing. Our findings will go to increase knowledge in the auditory sciences regarding factors that influence processing of binaural cues in order to form a more cohesive picture of the auditory network, and may be used to increase the effectiveness of architectural designs of music, concert, and conference halls.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Raymond H Dye, Jr. (Chair of the Psychology Department)

Comments

The original proposal for the Mulcahy Scholars Program included another level of analysis (interactions across cues), but due to the university closing we are unable to include that section at this time.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Precedence Effects in Binaural Hearing: Do they exist for both time and level differences?

Up until recently work in the field of binaural hearing has operated under the prevailing belief that interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) produce similar “precedence effects.” However, recent evidence seems to suggest that precedence effects are much more robust for stimuli carrying an ITD than those carrying an ILD. In order to further explore how the precedence effect varies across binaural cues, we will examine the asymmetries in the processing of ITDs and ILDs as subjects make several left-right judgments based on information carried by an echo pulse in the presence of a binaural cue (ITD or ILD) favoring the left or right ear. We expect to see more pronounced precedence effects for conditions containing an ITD, as is consistent with the most recent data on binaural hearing. Our findings will go to increase knowledge in the auditory sciences regarding factors that influence processing of binaural cues in order to form a more cohesive picture of the auditory network, and may be used to increase the effectiveness of architectural designs of music, concert, and conference halls.