Presenter Information

Maggie O'BrienFollow

Major

Environmental Science

Anticipated Graduation Year

2021

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

Hybrid cattail (Typha x glauca) threatens native plant species in Great Lakes coastal wetlands and can impact belowground conditions and processes. I hypothesize that soil seed bank and microbial diversity decrease along a gradient of time-since-invasion by Typha. I collected soil samples a Typha-invaded wetland. The extant plant community was significantly different in areas invaded for over 20 years compared to areas invaded in the past 5 years, but I found no reduction in seed bank plant diversity. I also plan to extract and sequence microbial DNA from soil samples to determine bacterial diversity.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Drew Monks, Research Associate, IES; Shane Lishawa, research associate, IES; John Kelly, professor, Biology Department

Supported By

University of Michigan Biological Station

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Invasive cattail residence time affects plant communities and belowground processes

Hybrid cattail (Typha x glauca) threatens native plant species in Great Lakes coastal wetlands and can impact belowground conditions and processes. I hypothesize that soil seed bank and microbial diversity decrease along a gradient of time-since-invasion by Typha. I collected soil samples a Typha-invaded wetland. The extant plant community was significantly different in areas invaded for over 20 years compared to areas invaded in the past 5 years, but I found no reduction in seed bank plant diversity. I also plan to extract and sequence microbial DNA from soil samples to determine bacterial diversity.