Presenter Information

Lana TinawiFollow

Major

Physics

Anticipated Graduation Year

2020

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

The 4th chromosome in Drosophila species is made of heterochromatin, tightly packed regions that are gene poor. In most genomes, heterochromatic regions are considered transcriptionally-silent; however, this isn’t the case for the 4th chromosome in Drosophila. Many of the genes on the 4th chromosome are required for development and survival; thus, the goal is to identify regulatory regions that allow these genes to be accessible and expressed despite their presence in a heterochromatic environment. Annotating the genomes of Drosophila species and comparing them to the previously annotated genome of D. melanogaster helps us gain a better understanding of these mechanisms.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Jennifer Mierisch

Comments

my major is biophysics but that wasn't an option lol

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Share

COinS
 

Annotating the D. ananassae Genome

The 4th chromosome in Drosophila species is made of heterochromatin, tightly packed regions that are gene poor. In most genomes, heterochromatic regions are considered transcriptionally-silent; however, this isn’t the case for the 4th chromosome in Drosophila. Many of the genes on the 4th chromosome are required for development and survival; thus, the goal is to identify regulatory regions that allow these genes to be accessible and expressed despite their presence in a heterochromatic environment. Annotating the genomes of Drosophila species and comparing them to the previously annotated genome of D. melanogaster helps us gain a better understanding of these mechanisms.