Presenter Information

Monica ContractorFollow

Major

Psychology

Anticipated Graduation Year

2020

Access Type

Restricted Access

Abstract

Gender harassment creates a hostile environment on college campuses (Greenhalgh-Spencer & Taylor, 2019) and is understudied (Leskinen & Cortina, 2014). However it is associated with implications on mental and physical health (e.g., e.g., Bowling and Beehr, 2006; Rabelo & Cortina, 2014; Willness, Steel & Lee, 2007), as well as fosters a culture that facilitates sexual and physical violence toward women (e.g., Kabat-Farr & Cortina, 2014).Though research suggests people are less inclined to confront sexism due to the social costs (Woodzicka & LaFrance, 2002), some confrontations can produce positive responses and increase men’s ability to detect sexist language in the future (e.g., Mallet & Wagner, 2011). This study examined the effect of three types of responses to a sexist remark.

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Dr. Loretta Stalans

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Responding to Gender Harassment in Educational Environments

Gender harassment creates a hostile environment on college campuses (Greenhalgh-Spencer & Taylor, 2019) and is understudied (Leskinen & Cortina, 2014). However it is associated with implications on mental and physical health (e.g., e.g., Bowling and Beehr, 2006; Rabelo & Cortina, 2014; Willness, Steel & Lee, 2007), as well as fosters a culture that facilitates sexual and physical violence toward women (e.g., Kabat-Farr & Cortina, 2014).Though research suggests people are less inclined to confront sexism due to the social costs (Woodzicka & LaFrance, 2002), some confrontations can produce positive responses and increase men’s ability to detect sexist language in the future (e.g., Mallet & Wagner, 2011). This study examined the effect of three types of responses to a sexist remark.