Presenter Information

Ashley MulfordFollow

Major

Bioinformatics

Anticipated Graduation Year

2020

Access Type

Open Access

Abstract

The development of effective treatments is vital in the fight against cancer, the second leading cause of death globally. Cancer is a personalized disease without an overarching cure, thus it is important to consider how genetic variation affects the drug response of individuals. After performing both GWAS and TWAS, we discovered several novel SNPs as well as two genes to be significantly associated with chemotherapy cytotoxicity within and across different ethnic cohorts. By identifying variants associated with toxicity, we strive to understand how genetic factors impact the effectiveness of existing chemotherapy drugs and enable future developments in precision medicine.

Community Partners

University of Chicago

Faculty Mentors & Instructors

Heather E. Wheeler, Associate Professor, Biology and Computer Science Departments

Supported By

Claudia Wing, Senior Research Scientist, University of Chicago; M. Eileen Dolan, Professor, University of Chicago

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Genetics of Chemotherapy Toxicity in Human Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines from Diverse Populations

The development of effective treatments is vital in the fight against cancer, the second leading cause of death globally. Cancer is a personalized disease without an overarching cure, thus it is important to consider how genetic variation affects the drug response of individuals. After performing both GWAS and TWAS, we discovered several novel SNPs as well as two genes to be significantly associated with chemotherapy cytotoxicity within and across different ethnic cohorts. By identifying variants associated with toxicity, we strive to understand how genetic factors impact the effectiveness of existing chemotherapy drugs and enable future developments in precision medicine.